Investing

How To Buy The Warren Buffett Mutual Fund

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A few days ago, Motley Fool published an article entitled, The Warren Buffett Mutual Fund. Now, just to be clear, Warren Buffett runs Berkshire Hathaway, not a mutual fund. But the article pointed out that investing in Berkshire can be difficult, because a single A share of the company will set you back a cool $111,600. Even a B share, which equals 1/30 of an A share, runs about $3,625. So Motley Fool noted that a number of mutual funds have invested a substantial amount of their portfolio in Berkshire Hathaway. By investing in those funds, you are investing in Berkshire. The article identified several of these funds, but ended with a bit of a tease.

The article described a fund that invests about 18% of its assets in Berkshire, but didn't give up the name of the fund. Instead, if you want to know the fund, the article asked you to sign up for The Motley Fool Champion Funds newsletter. Now, I've never read this newsletter, and it may well be worth the $149 annual subscription fee, although I have my doubts. But if you want to know which funds own the most Berkshire, or any other company for that matter, the answer is just a few FREE clicks away. Here's how--

  1. Go to Morningstar
  2. Type in BRK.A (or any other company ticker symbol) into the Quotes box near the top left of the page
  3. On the left sidebar, click on the Insider Trading link
  4. And then click on the Concentrated Fund Owners tab that will appear just below the name of the company

And there you have it. The Sequoia fund (SEQUX) has invested just over 25% of its assets in BRK.A-shares. You can buy fractional BRK.A or BRK.B shares through ShareBuilder. In other words, you don’t have to pony up $111,600 for an A share or even $3,625 for a B share. If you want to invest a couple of hundred dollars each month in Berkshire, you can do so at ShareBuilder for $4 a trade. And just to be clear, I don’t have a Sharebuilder account (yet), and I don’t own shares of Berkshire (yet). You can read other tips on how to use Morningstar in the online investing section of The Dough Roller.

Update: I now have a Sharebuilder account and own shares of Berkshire Hathaway.


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