Official 2011 Income Tax Brackets

With 2011 about to come to a close, my mind always turns to taxes. For the 2011 tax year, tax returns will be due April 17, 2012 (April 15, 2012 falls on a Sunday and April 16, 2012 is Emancipation Day in the District of Columbia). So I thought it would be helpful to pull together the income tax brackets for 2011. This information is helpful if you want to know what the your marginal tax bracket is or if you want to find out how much you will owe in taxes.

2011 IRS Tax Brackets

Here are the official tax brackets and rates for 2011:

Tax RateSingle FilersMarried filing jointly OR
qualifying widow/widower
Married filing separatelyHead of household
10%Up to $8,500Up to $17,000Up to $8,500 Up to $12,150
15%$8,501 - $34,500$17,001 - $69,000$8,501- $34,500$12,151 - $46,250
25%$34,501 - $83,600$69,001 - $139,350$34,501 - $69,675$46,251 - $119,400
28%$83,601 - $174,400$139,351 - $212,300$69,676 - $106,150$119,401 - $193,350
33%$174,401 - $379,150$212,301 - $379,150$106,151 - $189,575$193,351 - $379,150
35%$379,151 or more$379,151 or more$189,576 or more$379,151 or more

The tables below will help you calculate your taxes that are due based on your filing status. As you can see, the tables break down each filing status and give a short description of each. Keep in mind, your taxes due are based on your adjusted income which is after you account for deductions and other adjustments. If you need more information about your filing status, you can visit the IRS website for more details.

Single Filers

You can file as a Single Filer if you are unmarried, divorced or legally separated on December 31 of the filing year.

Taxable IncomeTax
$0 – $8,5000% of taxable income
$8,500 – $34,500$850 plus 15% of excess over $8,500
$34,500 – $83,600$4,750 plus 25% of excess over $34,500
$83,600 – $174,400$17,025 plus 28% of excess over $83,600
$174,400 – $379,150$42,449 plus 33% of excess over $174,400
$379,150+$110,016.50 plus 35% of excess over $379,150

Married & Surviving Spouses

If you are married and filing jointly or if your spouse died during the year you can still file jointly.

Taxable IncomeTax
$0 – $17,00010% of taxable income
$17,000 – $69,000$1,700 plus 15% of excess over $17,000
$69,000 – $139,350$9,500 plus 25% of excess over $69,000
$139,350 – $212,300$27,087.50 plus 28% of excess over $139,350
$212,300 – $379,150$47,513.50 plus 33% of excess over $212,300
$379,150+$102,574 plus 35% of excess over $379,150

Head of Household

If you are unmarried or legally considered to be unmarried on December 31st of the filing year and you paid more than half the cost for your home you can file as Head of Household. There are special tax breaks for those that file this way.

Taxable Income Tax
$0 – $12,15010% of taxable income
$12,150 – $46,250$1,215 plus 15% of excess over $12,150
$46,250 – $119,400$6,330 plus 25% of excess over $46,250
$119,400 – $193,350$24,617.50 plus 28% of excess over $119,400
$193,350 – $379,150$45,323.50 plus 33% of excess over $193,350
$379,150+$106,637.50 plus 35% of excess over $379,150

Married Filing Separately

If you are married you can choose to file separately. This could benefit you if it results in less tax than filing a joint return.

Taxable IncomeTax
$0 – $8,50010% of taxable income
$8,500 – $34,500$850 plus 15% of excess over $8,500
$34,500 – $69,675$4,750 plus 25% of excess over $34,500
$69,675 – $106,150$13,543.75 plus 28% of excess over $69,675
$106,150 – $189,575$23,756.75 plus 33% of excess over $106,150
$189,575+$51,287 plus 35% of excess over $189,575

2011 Standard Deductions

When you file your tax return, you can choose to either take a standard deduction or itemize your deductions. The standard deduction amount you are eligible for is determined by your filing status, your age, any disabilities, and whether or not you are claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer. You can take the standard deduction if your filing status is Single, Married filing jointly, Married filing separately, or Head of Household. Here is what the standard deductions look like for 2011:

  • If you are either single or married and filing separately the standard deduction is $5,700.
  • If you are married and filing jointly or you have a dependent then your standard deduction will be $11,400.
  • If you claim head of household your standard deduction will be $8,400.

Each year the government adjusts the standard deduction based on inflation. Some tax payers might have different standard deductions based on their age or a disability. For example, if you 65 or older of if you are legally blind you might get an additional deduction amount.

Published or Updated: December 30, 2011
About Rob Berger

Rob founded the Dough Roller in 2007. A litigation attorney in the securities industry, he lives in Northern Virginia with his wife, their two teenagers, and the family mascot, a shih tzu named Sophie.

Comments

  1. Cathy J says:

    I’ve just about completed our 2011 taxes and was shocked to see we owed this year, compared to the last two years, which gave us fairly significant refunds. Yes, I did earn more, but we also had over $16,000 in medical expenses we itemized. Our gross together was just short of $126,000. Filing jointly puts us in the 25% bracket. I’m wondering if it’s even worth the time and effort to see if we should file separately. I grossed $35,800 and my husband $90,000. That puts me borderline at the 15%-25%, depending on deductions and him at 28%. Our daughter turned 17, so we lost a her child care credit and our income significantly reduced our other daughter’s deduction. We use TurboTax. Thoughts on whether it’s worth trying the calculations to file separately?

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